Publishers interested in having their content distributed online through a content licensing and syndication portal while making revenue at the same time should check out repubHub (repubhub.com). Powered by iCopyright, repubHub launched in May and currently works with hundreds of publications, such as the Chicago Tribune, Miami Herald and Toronto Star. There is no cost for publishers to be in the repubHub network.

Chairman Dan Sauerhaft said what makes repubHub unique is that the platform can accommodate publishers of all sizes. The platform also solves two problems for publishers: it protects their content online and helps them monetize original content.

Once a publisher downloads the iCopyright toolbar, their content is automatically uploaded into the repubHub network. Users type in keywords in the repubHub search box, select from those articles and get permission to republish with just a click of a button. Users are then given the option to copy and paste HTML to embed the copy on their website for free, thanks to ad support. They also have the option to forego ads by paying a licensing fee instead. Fees vary and are controlled by publishers.

Once that article is republished, the button to republish the article is linked to that copy, so anyone who comes across it also has the option to republish the article, creating what Sauerhaft called “viral syndication.”

Sauerhaft explained revenue is split between iCopyright and publishers. If publishers go through iCopyright, they receive 80 percent, but if they don’t install the toolbar and only go through repubHub, they receive 60 percent instead.

If publishers sign on to the toolbar, they also have access to the iCopyright conductor, which operates like a dashboard. Sauerhaft said publishers can set pricing and view reports in real time through that system.

Not only does repubHub create revenue for publishers, but it also protects their content in several ways. Sauerhaft said if someone tries to right-click and copy a republished article through repubHub, they will be prompted to obtain a license first.

Second, publishers have access to the discovery module, which allows publishers to search for and find any suspected copyright infringement material online. If anything is found, Sauerhaft said a notice will be automatically sent for the user to either purchase the copyright to publish the content or to take it down.

“Our goal is to become the most widely accepted syndication and monetization network for large and small publishers,” Sauerhaft said. “We want journalists to earn a living, get them paid, so they continue to do quality work.”

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