Democrats did well on Election Day, but syndicates didn't find lots of new clients for liberal columns and cartoons during the following month.

"I haven't seen any change," says Lisa Klem Wilson, United Media's senior vice president/general manager. Alan Shearer, editorial director/general manager of the Washington Post Writers Group, adds, "It's been pretty much business as usual."

Creators Syndicate National Sales Director Margo Sugrue says she had "maybe one or two" extra client requests for samples of liberal features.

Syndicate executives say many papers fill their opinion pages without regard to America's political climate. King Features Managing Editor Glenn Mott adds that U.S. dailies run more conservative than liberal columns, but some are willing to consider liberal voices such as King's autumn-launched Amy Goodman.

Creators Vice President/Editorial Director Kathy Kei says she'll "probably be on the lookout" for additional liberal voices who may appeal to a growing non-conservative readership. But she, Universal Press Syndicate Vice President/Managing Editor Sue Roush, and other executives say they seek ability more than ideology in new talent.

"We try to keep a balance," adds Copley News Service Vice President/Editor Glenda Winders. "The mood of the country might go one way, but there are still newspapers and readers on the other side."