The launch of Vox.com last month shined a spotlight on explanatory journalism—that is, journalism that seeks to contextualize the news cycle. Rather than breaking original news, Vox seeks to both report relevant stories and to provide companion context for important stories breaking elsewhere.

Explanatory journalism isn’t new, and neither is the idea of continuously adding content to a Web page. Mother Jones has been publishing (and updating) explainers online since 2011. What’s new is a publicly declared ambition to be a user’s guide for the news, not only through content, but also through the architecture of the site itself; in a sense, this is a design-driven news literacy effort where brands create trusted news context tethered to the latest updates. One way Vox does this is by linking throughout its stories to cards, continuously updated stacks of slides that look and feel like digital study guides and form an integral part of the site’s user experience.

- See more at: http://www.cjr.org/news_literacy/explanatory_site_architecture.php#sthash.v20YDcQI.dpuf
The launch of Vox.com last month shined a spotlight on explanatory journalism—that is, journalism that seeks to contextualize the news cycle. Rather than breaking original news, Vox seeks to both report relevant stories and to provide companion context for important stories breaking elsewhere.

Explanatory journalism isn’t new, and neither is the idea of continuously adding content to a Web page. Mother Jones has been publishing (and updating) explainers online since 2011. What’s new is a publicly declared ambition to be a user’s guide for the news, not only through content, but also through the architecture of the site itself; in a sense, this is a design-driven news literacy effort where brands create trusted news context tethered to the latest updates. One way Vox does this is by linking throughout its stories to cards, continuously updated stacks of slides that look and feel like digital study guides and form an integral part of the site’s user experience.


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