After managing to keep their honeymoon destination secret throughout their 2008 wedding preparations, Denmark’s Prince Joachim and his bride Marie must have wondered how a Danish reporter was able to find them on their flight home (they answered his questions politely). Six years later, they have their answer. On April 28, Danish newspaper BT broke the news that the gossip magazine Se og Hør (“See and Hear”) purportedly paid a contractor for the banking services company Nets to monitor the credit card activity of members of the royal family and other celebrities.

A little over a week later, the case has become the biggest media scandal in Danish history, and new revelations emerge each day. It has profoundly shocked a country far more accustomed to being hailed as a model of transparency than for News of the World-type shenanigans. And although many here within the media believe Se og Hør’s to be isolated in its tactics, a few critics have openly wondered whether something isn’t rotten in Denmark’s media culture as a whole

- See more at: http://www.cjr.org/behind_the_news/danish_media.php#sthash.zSIItFYP.dpuf

After managing to keep their honeymoon destination secret throughout their 2008 wedding preparations, Denmark’s Prince Joachim and his bride Marie must have wondered how a Danish reporter was able to find them on their flight home (they answered his questions politely). Six years later, they have their answer. On April 28, Danish newspaper BT broke the news that the gossip magazine Se og Hør (“See and Hear”) purportedly paid a contractor for the banking services company Nets to monitor the credit card activity of members of the royal family and other celebrities.

A little over a week later, the case has become the biggest media scandal in Danish history, and new revelations emerge each day. It has profoundly shocked a country far more accustomed to being hailed as a model of transparency than for News of the World-type shenanigans. And although many here within the media believe Se og Hør’s to be isolated in its tactics, a few critics have openly wondered whether something isn’t rotten in Denmark’s media culture as a whole

- See more at: http://www.cjr.org/behind_the_news/danish_media.php#sthash.zSIItFYP.dpuf
After managing to keep their honeymoon destination secret throughout their 2008 wedding preparations, Denmark’s Prince Joachim and his bride Marie must have wondered how a Danish reporter was able to find them on their flight home (they answered his questions politely). Six years later, they have their answer. On April 28, Danish newspaper BT broke the news that the gossip magazine Se og Hør (“See and Hear”) purportedly paid a contractor for the banking services company Nets to monitor the credit card activity of members of the royal family and other celebrities.

A little over a week later, the case has become the biggest media scandal in Danish history, and new revelations emerge each day. It has profoundly shocked a country far more accustomed to being hailed as a model of transparency than for News of the World-type shenanigans. And although many here within the media believe Se og Hør’s to be isolated in its tactics, a few critics have openly wondered whether something isn’t rotten in Denmark’s media culture as a whole.


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