THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

By: Jamie Santo Julie Dunlap to assistant international editor from assistant managing editor for news. Dunlap will be responsible for

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HAROLD ROSENTHAL, 85, sports writer and author, died June 29. Rosenthal worked at the New York Herald Tribune for over 30 years. He was noted for his baseball coverage of Brooklyn’s Dodgers and New York’s Giants, Mets, and Yankees, whom he followed from 1947 to 1963. When the Herald Tribune went out of business in 1966, Rosenthal moved into public relations, serving the Continental Football League and the American Football League. After the AFL merged with the National Football League, he served as director of information for its American Football Conference.

By: Jamie Santo Rosenthal also served as managing editor of “”Weekend Sports,”” a TV sports newspaper supplement. A lifetime member

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Iranian editor Faraj Sarkuhi was awarded the Golden Pen of Freedom by the World Association of Newspapers. Sarkuhi, the former editor in chief of the banned monthly magazine Adineh, was imprisoned both before and after Iran’s Islamic revolution in 1979. Adineh, which contained social criticism popular among intellectuals, had its license revoked last February. Sarkuhi went into exile in Germany last year. In recent months, Iran’s judiciary has shut down six publications and arrested six journalists for allegedly publishing lies.

By: Jamie Santo The Newspaper Association of America’s Research Award was presented posthumously to the late Thomas J. Holbein, executive

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ALVIN E. AUSTIN, 89, longtime head of the University of North Dakota’s journalism department, died June 13. An erstwhile editor of the Grand Forks (N.D.) Herald, he is generally credited with popularizing his university’s athletic teams as the “”Sioux.””

By: Jamie Santo JOHN H. CONNOR, 84, retired editor of The Daily News in Batavia, N.Y., died June 15 after

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The National Press Club will present Carl T. Rowan, a Washington, D.C.-based author, TV commentator, and nationally syndicated columnist, with its 1999 Fourth Estate Award, for lifetime achievement in journalism. The award will be presented Nov. 4 at a black-tie reception dinner with several leading figures of the nation’s capital in attendance. Rowan now writes a thrice-weekly column that is syndicated by King Features Syndicate Inc. and appears in 75 newspapers. He is the author of several books and has been appearing on TV as a commentator for more than 30 years. Rowan is the 27th recipient of the Fourth Estate Award. The first was Walter Cronkite in 1973.

By: Vernelle Dorvil The Detroit Metropolitan Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists selected Lisa Zagaroli, a reporter for the

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MAXWELL HARRELSON, 92, former correspondent for The Associated Press, died of a heart attack May 28 in Winchendon, Mass. He started his career with the AP in Albany, N.Y., and continued as a correspondent in Yugoslavia, Greece, and Hungary during the early stages of World War II. Later, he joined the war effort and served as a U.S. Army captain. He returned to the states to serve as correspondent at the United Nations for the next 22 years. He retired in 1972 and moved to Winchendon.

By: Vernelle Dorvil MICKEY HUMPHREY, 42, a Waco (Texas) Tribune-Herald sports writer, died of brain cancer May 29. Humphrey was

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Harold F. Grumhaus, who died May 29 in Naples, Fla., at the age of 96, rose from Chicago Tribune assistant production manager to chairman and chief executive officer of Tribune Co. in the course of a four-decade career which spanned the one-man leadership of Col. Robert R. McCormick to a modern multi-media corporation.

By: Vernelle Dorvil In 1960, five years after McCormick’s death, Grumhaus was Chicago Tribune production manager when he was appointed

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The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism presented the annual Mike Berger Award, with a $1,000 prize, to Charles LeDuff, a reporter for The New York Times, for his writing style, and stories reflecting the lives of everyday New Yorkers.

By: Vernell Dorvil The Southern Environmental Law Center announced Bill Finch and Sam Hodges, staff reporters for The Mobile (Ala.)

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Sixteen students have been chosen as the 1999 Associated Press Interns. The summer internship program, is open to students of Black, Latino, Asian, and Native American decent, who are either juniors, seniors, or in graduate school. The finalist were selected from over 100 applicants nationwide.

By: Vernelle Dorvil Listed below are the names of the finalist, the Universities attended, and the AP’s host bureau location

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