Latest from the E&P Newsroom

Impeding the free press for Native Americans

More than 300 print and digital publications serve the federally recognized Indigenous nations in the United States. Most of the tribal news organizations — an estimated 72% of newspapers, news sites and radio stations — are owned or funded to some degree by tribal governments. That gives those governments unusual control over local news media.

States starve publishers of ad dollars if they refuse to pledge political allegiance

In this 113th episode of “E&P Reports, Alan Leveritt publisher of the Arkansas Times and ACLU Senior Staff Attorney Brian Hauss talk about a two year battle, that has gained international prominence, between the Times and the state of Arkansas, on the newspapers’ refusal to sign a pledge to support Israel in order to continue receiving advertising dollars from the state university. Also, on the program appears award winning film producer Julia Bacha, who has just completed a documentary on the impact of state legislation designed to penalize individuals and companies that choose to boycott Israel due to its human rights record.

Newspapers have unique advantages to attract more political ad dollars

Newspapers have many opportunities to deliver an audience to political advertising campaigns. First, however, they need a better understanding of how the mechanics of political ad spending work, which types of campaigns will benefit from newspaper advertising and how to study demographic insights in context.

More E&P "Exclusives"
It appears the United States Postal Service (USPS) is jumping on the bandwagon, adding one more financial and operational burden to newspapers nationwide. Effective Aug. 29, the Postal Regulatory Commission approved raising rates for newspapers to 9%. The National Newspaper Association (NNA) and News Media Alliance pushed back on these increases.
On Wednesday afternoon (Nov. 24, 2021), Lee Enterprises, announced in a press release that “its Board of Directors has unanimously adopted a limited-duration shareholder rights plan (Rights Plan)." Within the statement from Lee Chairman Mary Junck: "Consistent with its fiduciary duties, Lee's Board has taken this action to ensure our shareholders receive fair treatment, full transparency and protection in connection with Alden's unsolicited proposal to acquire Lee."
The Scott C. Schurz Press Freedom Teacher Award celebrates teachers worldwide who educate young people about the need for journalism and the real-world dangers to journalists everywhere. This year, the award recognizes three outstanding educators from three continents.
News publishers have shared in the hardships along the way, struggling to balance the duty to inform the public about stats, guidelines and mandates with the need to operate responsibly and protect their employees from being harmed or from harming others, which was a concern for journalists working in the field. E&P felt it was vital to take the industry's pulse and understand the COVID-19 challenges that have passed and those that linger. So we asked our readers to take a short survey to let us know about their pandemic-related policies and how they're fairing today.
For too many years, reporting on gender, politics and policy and their effect on overlooked segments of society have not been seen “above the fold.” So the 19th, an independent, nonprofit newsroom, was created and is working hard to push these issues forward.
There’s no shortage of leadership and can-do spirit in newspaper production departments and printing plants around the country. That’s what the industry revealed to the International Newspaper Group (ING) and Editor & Publisher (E&P), co-sponsors of the 2021 Operations All-Stars Awards, which this year received four times the number of nominations compared to the previous year.
In Oregon, newspaper publisher Pamplin Media Group decided to take a stand to support the Local Journalism Sustainability Act (LJSA). On Wednesday, Nov. 3, they published a mostly blank front page with a simple line of copy: "What if there were no local reporters?"
Finding growth opportunities is one of the newspaper industry's biggest challenges. Still, Judi Terzotis, president and publisher of The Times-Picayune of New Orleans and The Advocate, published in Baton Rouge and Lafayette, has already established herself as a growth leader — and it’s why she has been chosen as Editor & Publisher’s 2021 Publisher of the Year.
The Dart Center Style Guide for Trauma-Informed Journalism is intended to be "an educational tool for all journalists to increase their knowledge and interest in this topic as well as improving their skills and boosting their professional integrity,” says Executive Director Bruce Shapiro.
Ask any journalist what makes their blood pressure go up on deadline. It is being routed to a public affairs office without getting the interview, missing a deadline, or just getting a pre-screened department-organized message. Lately, the public — and even local reporters who have not covered a Washington, D.C. beat — are unaware of how restricted access has become at the federal level.
America is often described as a country constantly reinventing itself. If this is correct, then loud and often violent discourse is the forge of that reinvention. Journalists of all stripes and persuasions report on the issues feeding the forge's fire but do so according to a set of journalistic core values.
During May of 2020, the fiercely independent newsweekly couldn’t generate any income, as the flow of advertising dollars stopped. Then, during June, the paper initially launched in 1997, paused publication and laid off its entire staff. Now, 15 months later, the new MauiTimes is back!
ThinkNewsBrands, a cooperative of Australian publishers, has studied advertising effectiveness across media platforms — in its “Benchmark and Payback Series.” In August, the group released a new installment in the series, The Social Chapter, which looked at key indicators and ad metrics. In August, the group released a new installment in the series, The Social Chapter, which looked at key indicators and ad metrics, such as short-term and long-term memory recall, and “brand lift” —
Gannett remains at the top of the leaderboard for newspaper ownership. It publishes over 1,000 weekly titles and more than 100 dailies, amassed over the years through independent acquisitions and headlining mergers. But the company turned heads in the newspaper world when it recently began selling off some of those newspapers, mostly small-market and community titles that local owners were eager to buy.
The newspaper seller position is still a strong career choice, according to the results of the annual 2021 Newspaper Sales Compensation Study co-sponsored by Editor & Publisher and America's Newspapers. The survey shows that more newspapers are utilizing separate sales staffs for digital and the average size of sales teams remained relatively constant.
We’re well past the halfway point for the year, and in many ways, it’s starting to feel like the new normal is setting in. It’s not quite what most of us were used to, but as new buying habits, new patterns, new products, and new services have changed everyone’s lives, we’re starting to see groves form as the baseline for “normal” shifts.
When was the last time you called your own phone system? If you don’t remember, now is the time to make that call. Literally, stop reading right now and call your own main number—not somebody’s office, call the one that rings to your auto attendant.
While managing different companies over the years, I learned a few tricks with onboarding new employees. One of my favorites could help a lot of people in the coming months.
It may seem impossible after dealing with the pandemic for so long, but we are finally on the cusp of the world reopening. There’s some variance depending on where you are, your vaccination rates, and other important factors, but the overall trend is that we're certainly inching closer to a post-pandemic world.
After more than 12 months of getting by in a pandemic, I think it’s fair to say that we’ve all learned a lot. We’ve all but made it through one of the biggest business disruptions in contemporary history, and that has required a lot of adaptation and flexibility from all of us.
I recently had lunch with a friend of mine who’s an architect, and in our conversation about our lives, he told me that before he shows a client a first draft of his work, he gives them a disclaimer: “This is not the house you need. It’s the house you thought you wanted.”
Congratulations. You’ve started your year and the 2021 budget is officially in full swing. Bet it’s going just how you planned it, right? You put time and research into crafting your budget, you make educated assumptions, and you put in the work to get ready for the new year.
Collaboration is a buzzword that we hear a lot. To some extent, we all know why it’s important: More eyes on a project can lead to more ideas, better troubleshooting, etc. And while collaboration is all well and good, it’s important to consider the real, operational costs of bringing everyone together.
It would be a drastic understatement to say that we’re living in a time of change. In the past eight months, we have seen core improvements to the way we approach long-distance communication. So, what does that mean for the traditional office meeting?
The phrase “unprecedented times” has become a platitude at this point, and while this situation is unique, I believe that we can draw from past experiences to help navigate these new …
Read the Current Issue Online