CHILDREN’S ONLINE PRIVACY ACT IMPLEMENTED

By: Staff Reports

Web Sites Collecting Data On Minors Must Get Parents’ Permission





Provisions of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act go into effect today.


Passed on Oct. 22, 1998, the law prohibits Web sites from knowingly collecting data from children under age 13 unless parental consent has been granted. The Federal Trade Commission is administering the law, which was opposed strongly by the likes of the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation.



The Newspaper Association of America (NAA) reviewed the FTC’s final regulations and compiled suggestions for how newspapers and their Web operations can comply.



The FTC rule requires sites to include mention of what information the site collects and how it will be used. A policy must state that parents can review and delete the child’s personal information if it was gathered without the parent’s consent. Web sites that do not comply can be fined $10,000.


A quick survey of newspaper Web sites shows that some sites have privacy policies (located at the bottom of their homepages) that mention children. The other sites mention data collection procedures, but do not mention children directly and do not mention parental consent as a requirement for children to submit data. Some newspaper Web sites still don’t have privacy policies posted.


Nando Media, a division of The McClatchy Co., has gone so far as to provide a link to a parental consent form on its Web sites.





Related story:

NEWSPAPERS REACT TO CHILDREN’S ONLINE PRIVACY ACT (11/02/99)



Related stories from elsewhere:

CHILDREN’S NET PRIVACY LAW GOES INTO EFFECT
(Cnet)



KIDS’ PRIVACY AN ACT, OR ACTION?

(Wired News)





Copyright 2000, Editor & Publisher.

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