FRIDAY’S LINKS: A Secret the Press Kept, Boston Papers’ Cover the ‘Big Dig’ Disaster, ‘Journal Sentinel’ to Be Sold?

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By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, Google’s profits climb sharply on advertising revenue, questions of whether a Milwaukee paper will be sold to large conglomerate, and Boston’s papers’ full-court press coverage of the “Big Dig” disaster.


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Google Profit Surges on Strong Search Advertising
New York Times: Google?s profits more than doubled in the second quarter, as the company continued to increase its share of the lucrative search advertising market. The company, which announced results yesterday, exceeded analysts’ expectations for both sales and profit. That is in contrast to Yahoo, which disappointed Wall Street Tuesday with lower-than-expected revenue from search-related advertising. Yahoo met profit expectations because it postponed some hiring and advertising spending.


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‘Where’s the Money Coming From?’
Wall Street Journal: The former press baron, whose trial is scheduled to start next March in Chicago, is paying $95,000 a month in mortgage and property-tax payments for his Toronto estate, where he is living while out on bail. It is costing him $7,900 a month in gardening bills to maintain his 6?-acre property, which is valued by Ontario tax assessors at 8.57 million Canadian dollars (U.S.$7.56 million). Now, Judge Amy St. Eve of U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois is demanding that Mr. Black explain his spending.


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Behind the Pics of the Little Girls Writing on Artillery Shells
CJR Daily: “The sweet-faced little Israeli girls drawing with markers have their hair in pigtails,” writes Gal Beckerman. “It makes it all the more shocking, then, that they are doodling on artillery shells — shells about to be aimed at Lebanon, where several hundred civilians have been killed in the past few days. Any photographer would be out of his mind not to capture this shot. No wonder, then, that those photographs, taken by Associated Press photographer Sebastian Scheiner, showed up everywhere. But reality is always more complicated (and infinitely more interesting) than propaganda, and it’s worth understanding the provenance of these photos, at least as an example of how much we miss when we react emotionally to pictures that are intended to get us riled up.”


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A Secret the Media Kept
Washington Post: “Toward the end of 1979, hundreds of American and Canadian journalists and news organizations got hold of a dynamite news story that would have made personal reputations and careers and sent circulation or broadcast ratings soaring,” writes Michael Berlin. “The facts were confirmed, unassailably. Any one of these reporters could have had the scoop of a lifetime. And yet not one reporter, newspaper, network or newsletter ran with the story until given permission to do so (all at once) by the governments involved. No court or governmental threat of retribution forced them to do so. It was all voluntary.”


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TV War Correspondents Rescued From Angry Mob by Hezbullah?
Guardian: Two British journalists were recovering in Beirut last night after being attacked by a mob which surrounded their car for almost an hour, smashing windows and trying to force them out. The journalists from GMTV, and their Lebanese interpreter and driver were rescued when two men thought to be Hizbullah officials pushed through the crowd, grabbed them and drove them to a safe house, television colleagues said.


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Will ‘Journal Sentinel’ Be Sold to a Conglomerate?
Milwaukee Magazine: Ever since becoming a publicly traded company in 2003, there has been speculation that Journal Communications or its newspaper, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, could be purchased by a big conglomerate like Gannett Company Inc. Those predictions have heated up as the Milwaukee company?s stock has plummeted in value. ?Honestly, a sale is the only possible salvation for the company,? says a major stock holder who oversees large-scale mergers and acquisitions.


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‘Herald’ Gossips Gone Wild
Boston Magazine: John Gonzoles writes that critics of the Boston Herald’s Inside Track have long accused the gossip column of being malicious and pandering. Nowadays, he says, those are some of the nicest things you can say about it.


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Digging for Attention
Boston Phoenix: As the New York dailies were running front covers of the Middle East edging toward war, Boston was enveloped in one of its biggest local stories in recent memory ? the tunnel collapse inside the beleaguered $14.6 billion highway project at the heart of Boston?s transportation system. The Herald got there first, bragging about breaking the news on its Web site hours after the accident, and devoting 15 pages to Del Valle?s death and its aftermath on Wednesday. But while the Globe started slow, it quickly brought its considerable resources to bear on the story. Here?s how the dailies? Big Dig battle played out.

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