FRIDAY’S LINKS: Shafer on Shamu Mania, Rage Against the MSMachine, Dow Jones to Reassess News Delivery

By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, more turmoil at the Santa Barbara Press-News, Dow Jones reassesses it’s news delivery, and a Metro USA executive who was demoted last year amid an uproar over racism charges is appointed to an advisory board at the company set up to monitor such behavior.


***

Dailies Strike Back At Web
BusinessWeek: Yahoo! and a loose consortium of newspaper publishers are mulling a partnership that would encompass Web classifieds, local news, and content packages based on general themes, like travel. This could drive more traffic to Yahoo’s help-wanted site HotJobs, which trails its key competitors, and bolster future Yahoo moves into local offerings. Newspaper companies would build a network within what is one of the Web’s top destinations and win a crucial concession in today’s search-engine economy: getting a cut of the ads sold around search results of their content. It’s a sore spot for publishers that this doesn’t happen now.


***

Dow Jones to Reassess News Delivery
New York Times: Dow Jones yesterday offered a clue to the possible next editorial overseer of The Wall Street Journal, its flagship publication, as the company twinned an announcement of the retirement date of the newspaper?s managing editor with the creation of a committee to reassess the ways it delivers news across all its print and online properties.


***

More Turmoil at Santa Barbara News-Press
Los Angeles Times: Normally genteel Santa Barbara convulsed with another round of recrimination Thursday over its daily newspaper ? with owner Wendy McCaw accusing journalists who quit her newsroom en masse of using the paper to air their biases, while one of the defectors slammed the wealthy owner as an amateurish meddler. Much of the fighting was conducted on the front pages of the Santa Barbara News-Press and the alternative weekly the Santa Barbara Independent.


***

Metro Exec, Demoted for Racism, Will Monitor Sensitivity
New York Post: A top newspaper exec who drew heat last year at freebie chain Metro International for being racially insensitive has been tapped for a company advisory board set up to monitor such behavior. Steve Nylund had been president of Metro USA, which publishes Metro New York, Metro Boston and Metro Philadelphia. He stepped down from that post in early ’05 during a furor over remarks he allegedly made at a conference. He has kept his executive vice president title at the parent company.


***

Rage Against the MSMachine
The Nation: “The media rage on the left–at least among those politically active online–now matches that on the right,” writes Lakshmi Chaudhry. “In one sense, all political bloggers, conservative or liberal, define themselves in opposition to mainstream journalists, who are viewed as elitists determined to marginalize the true will of the American people as represented by the bloggers themselves. … But where the right-wing blogosphere accuses journalists of ideological bias, the progressive netroots view them as corrupt and compromised.”


***

Buchwald Not Ready for Last Laugh
ABC News: Art Buchwald is supposed to be dead. Five months ago, the Pulitizer Prize-winning columnist voluntarily stopped dialysis treatment, checked into a Washington-area hospice and prepared for the end. But to the surprise and delight of his doctors, family and friends, Buchwald continues to live, announcing in a special column last week, “Instead of going straight upstairs, I am going to Martha’s Vineyard.”


***

How To Write a Hit Article: ‘NYT’ Shamu Essay Shows the Way
Slate: “Columns about men, women, and relationships are perennial favorites,” notes Jack Shafer. “But almost three weeks later, “What Shamu Taught Me About a Happy Marriage” remains near the top of the NYTimes.com’s constantly churning list of most-e-mailed articles and shows no sign of sinking. In addition to having been e-mailed a gazillion times, the piece has been mined by the Times’ own Maureen Dowd for a column. Early on, Salon interviewed author Amy Sutherland about the extraordinary response her piece was eliciting. And Technorati reports that hundreds have blogged about it.”


***

The Good Old Days of American Journalism
Grade the News: “Just as a star expands exponentially before it dies, the volume of free or cheap news swelled before it imploded,” writes John McManus. “Looking back on 2006, the signs were everywhere: The unexpected collapse of Knight Ridder, then the nation?s second largest newspaper chain and once one of the best. The consolidation of virtually every newspaper from San Rafael to San Jose under the auspices of Oakland Trib owner MediaNews ? one of journalism?s worst. We should have seen this coming when rather than competing, the San Francisco Chronicle?s owner, Hearst, assimilated, buying into the MediaNews monopoly.”

Like & Share E&P:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Visit Us
LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *