FRIDAY’S LINKS: ‘WaPo’ Buyouts, WH Policy Favors Fox News?, Penn. Gov. Backed Burkle’s PNI Bid

RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Visit Us
LinkedIn

By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, the Washington Post could lose some of its star writers to a round of planned buyouts, Air Force One televisions always seem to be tuned to Fox News, and the Governor of Pennsylvania backed Yucaipa’s bid to buy PNI from McClatchy.


***

‘WaPo’ Could Lose Signature Writers in Buyouts
Since the buyout offer became official on April 15, reporters and editors have been meeting daily with Post officials to work out the fine points of the deal, considered generous by newspaper standards, reports Harry Jaffe. At least two business writers have decided to move on. Jerry Knight, who has covered local business since 1977 and writes Monday?s Washington Investing column, is already booking flights to Paris. Al Crenshaw, 63, is ?strongly leaning toward it.? He came to the Post in 1972 and has been writing the Cash Flow column for the Sunday business section since 1987.


***

‘Is There A White House Policy That All Govt. TV’s Have To Be Tuned To Fox?’
The controversy du jour aboard Air Force One today was one near and dear to the hearts of many otherwise happy couples: Command and control of the TV tuner.


***

The Doyenne of the White House Press Corps.
At the age of 85, Helen Thomas is a little frail and her voice does not carry as well as it once did, but she cannot be easily overlooked. She has been reporting on the White House longer than most of her fellow journalists have been alive. She has interrogated every president since John F Kennedy, and she was on duty in Washington the day he was shot. She was standing in the doorway of the Oval Office when Lyndon B Johnson announced he would not stand for re-election, and she accompanied Richard Nixon on his historic trip to China in 1972. Along the way, Ms Thomas, now a columnist for Hearst Newspapers, has become an institution.


***

Court setback for ‘Seattle Times’, ‘P-I’
A King County Superior Court judge Thursday threw a monkey wrench into a plan by Seattle’s two daily newspapers to resolve their long-running legal dispute through binding arbitration. Judge Greg Canova rejected a bid by The Seattle Times Co. and The Hearst Corp., owner of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, to put all court proceedings on hold until arbitration concludes.


***

Bill O’Reilly, White House Flack
Q: What was the president’s reaction to the al-Zarqawi tape?
MR. O’REILLY: Since you’re a premium member of BillOReilly.com, Ms. Bumiller, I’d be happy to answer that. We have the al-Qaida leadership on the run, and we’re taking the fight to them in Iraq and in Afghanistan. We will continue to take these threats seriously, and we will win the war on terrorism. It’s just a shame that Cindy Sheehan and Ludacris and the New York Times provided the funds to make this vile piece of propaganda.


***

Columnist: MSM Still Trumps Bloggers
“Obviously, bloggers can do a lot of important work — ask Dan Rather, who lost his job as anchor of “The CBS Evening News” not long after bloggers exposed the deep flaws in a CBS broadcast about President Bush’s National Guard record,” writes Jon Friedman. “But if any people think that bloggers have become a more dominant media force than television or — dare I say it — print, they really need a reality check.”


***

Penn. Governor Backed Burkle’s Bid for Philly Papers
Gov. Edward G. Rendell contacted a McClatchy Co. board member this month to urge the newspaper chain to sell The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News to an investor group headed by prominent Democratic donor Ron Burkle. Rendell said in a brief interview Tuesday that he called Kevin McClatchy, owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates, about two weeks ago and asked him to pass on his support for Burkle’s California-based Yucaipa Cos. L.L.C. to the McClatchy Co.


***

Bulls’, Bears’ Views of Newspaper Blahs
“Bulls such as [Gary] Pruitt and [Dean] Singleton understand the intrinsic value of news in an information-hungry world. Bears are scared by slight newspaper circulation losses as the Internet has blossomed,” writes USA Today Founder Al Neuharth. “Similar nervousness about newspapers surfaced when television appeared more than 60 years ago. But now, as then, newspaper reporters and editors are the best gatherers of news and information on earth. Now, as then, their leaders will figure out how to distribute more news and information to more people in more ways more profitably. Not just on newsprint.”


***

Novel by Harvard Author Recalled From Stores
A teen novel containing admittedly borrowed material has been pulled from the market. Author Kaavya Viswanathan, a Harvard University sophomore, had acknowledged that numerous passages in “How Opal Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild and Got a Life” were lifted from another writer.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *