Latest Number of Dailies, Weeklies in E&P’s New International Year Book

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By: E&P Staff

The number of U.S. dailies declined by 15 to 1,422 in 2007 compared to the previous year, according to the newest edition of the Editor & Publisher International Yearbook.

The number of morning newspapers grew at the expense of evening papers. In 2007 there were 867 morning papers, versus 833 in 2006. But 49 evening papers were lost in 2007, resulting in a total of 565 evening papers. The number of “all-day” papers, which include newspapers that publish morning and evening editions, remained flat, at 10.

Total daily circulation in 2007, according to the E&P Yearbook, was about 50,741,600, down 3% compared to 2006 stats. Sunday circulation in 2007 fell 3.6% to 51,246,332. The total number of Sunday papers remained the same in 2007 compared to 2006 at 907.

California and Ohio tied as the two states with the most dailies, at 83 each.

The number of multi-newspaper cities fell by two cities to 36. Cincinnati, Ohio, and Hagerstown, Md., fell off the list.

The number of weekly newspapers also shrank in 2007. According to the E&P Yearbook, there were 6,253 weekly newspapers (4,259 paid, 1,029 free, and 965 combined paid and free). In 2006 there were 6,394 weekly newspapers (4,307 paid, 1,085 free, and 1,002 combined paid and free). Total circulation in 2007 for weeklies (including paid and free) was 46,896,483, down about 1.6% from 2006.

California has the most number of free weeklies at 102.

The number of shopper and TMC publications fell in 2007 to 1,250 from 1,333 in 2006.

Canada lost one daily in 2007. According to the E&P Yearbook, Canada has 99 dailies (64 morning, 35 evening) and 27 Sunday papers. In 2006 that breakout was 100 dailies (58 morning, 42 evening) and 27 Sunday papers. Total daily circulation was at 4,496,717, down 1.5% in 2007. Sunday circulation was at 2,843,686, down 2.7% during the same period.

To order the Editor & Publisher 2008 International Yearbook, go here.

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