Lurie Lures Readers With Animated Cartoons

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By: Dave Astor

Color, motion, music, and sound effects aren’t usually associated with editorial cartooning. But they are associated with Cartoonews International Syndicate, which this week began offering animated versions of Ranan Lurie’s work to newspaper Web sites.

Lurie noted that static black-and-white cartoons aren’t ideally suited for computer viewing. “Animated cartoons deliver the message in a more interesting way,” he told E&P Online.

With the help of several assistants, Lurie each week animates two of his four print cartoons. Clients can use the print ones, the animated ones, or both. The animated cartoons also appear on Cartoonews.com.

The New York-based Lurie was born in what is now Israel, and worked for that country’s Yedioth Aharonoth newspaper early in his career. He went on to do cartoons — often as an on-site staffer — for Life and then Newsweek International, Die Welt in Germany, The Times of London, Asahi Shimbun in Japan, U.S. News & World Report, Time International, Neue Zurcher Zeitung in Zurich, Switzerland, and Foreign Affairs. In 1996, Lurie founded Cartoon News, a current events/educational magazine that became online-only in 2001.

Lurie predicts that editorial cartooning will increasingly develop into more of an online medium. Writing recently in the Connecticut-based Greenwich magazine, he noted that “all the traditional qualities of a good editorial cartoon [are] multiplied” on the Web.

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Et cetera …

Tribune Media Services (TMS) columnist Arianna Huffington is a driving force behind “The Detroit Project,” a grassroots campaign to get Americans to think about how gas-guzzling SUVs affect not only the environment but foreign policy (by increasing U.S. dependence on oil from countries that support terrorism). The campaign (http://www.ariannaonline.com/suv
) has raised money to pay for provocative TV ads connecting SUVs to terrorism that play off the government commercials tying drug use to terrorism. “The Detroit Project” has been praised but has also received some criticism. The Oregonian of Portland is one detractor, dropping Huffington’s column because it felt she crossed the line from commentary to activism. Huffington doesn’t see a conflict, calling the campaign “a movement to raise awareness.” …

Edith Lank — who will move her real-estate column from TMS to Creators Syndicate March 1 — received exposure on The Sopranos. When Carmela Soprano studies for her real-estate license, the book she uses is Lank’s Essentials of New Jersey Real Estate. “Pretty exciting,” said Lank. …

“Stone Soup” is mirroring real life with a Jan. 27-launched sequence showing Val Stone getting downsized. The comic is by Jan Eliot of Universal Press Syndicate. …

Uclick — Universal’s online sibling company — began subscription programs on its MyComicsPage.com and The Puzzle Society page using Yaga Inc. technology. Yaga has helped a number of Web sites move to a paid-content model. …

“The Family Circus” by Bil and Jeff Keane of King Features Syndicate was the most-read comic in a Fort Worth (Texas) Star-Telegram survey that drew 6,536 responses. The next nine finishers were “For Better or For Worse” by Lynn Johnston of United Feature Syndicate, “Hagar the Horrible” by Chris Browne of King, “Garfield” by Jim Davis of Universal, “Beetle Bailey” by Mort Walker of King, “Peanuts” reruns by the late Charles Schulz of United, “Dennis the Menace” by Marcus Hamilton and Ron Ferdinand of King, “B.C.” by Johnny Hart of Creators, “Pluggers” by Gary Brookins of TMS, and “Baby Blues” by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman of King. …

“Sense & Sensitivity” advice columnist Harriette Cole of United has authored Choosing Truth: Living an Authentic Life (Simon & Schuster). …

At Large Features Syndicate in British Columbia has ceased operations. …

Susan Greene, wife of former Chicago Tribune/TMS columnist Bob Greene, died Jan. 25 at the age of 55.




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