Miller Speaks to Reporters After Testifying, Cites ‘Narrow Testimony’ as Key

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By: E&P Staff

“I testified as soon as I could, as soon as my conscience would allow,” Judith Miller told reporters after testifying before the federal grand jury investigating the Plame case. She reappeared shortly after 1 p.m., having arrived at the courtroom at 8:30 am.

Miller said she had insisted on two things: a voluntary waiver from her source, and the promise of only having to give what she called “narrow testimony.”

Looking a bit gaunt after 85 days in jail, Miller would not confirm that the source she had been protecting was I. Lewis Libby, even though her own paper has revealed that this is the case. She referred all questions about the source and negotiations to win her release to her lawyers.



She added: “I was a journalist doing my job and protecting my source until my source allowed me to testify.” Libby’s attorney, however, has insisted that his client offered a voluntary waiver as long as a year ago.

Asked what her “role” really was in this case, since she didn’t write an article on Plame, she said, “You’ll have to ask Mr. Fitzgerald [the prosecutor].”

When asked by one reporter whether she had essentially spent 85 days in jail “dancing on the head of a pin,” Miller responded: “I will let people draw their own conclusions. I know what my conscience would allow.”

She declared that “blanket waivers do not count, they should not be accepted by journalists” and that “they should be a thing of the past.” She also said that she hoped her “very long” stay in jail might help lead to a federal shield law.

Miller thanked the Times and average citizens who had written to her offering support.

She said she was very tired and anxious now to get home to a meal prepared by her husband “and a dog I’d like to hug.” Arthur Sulzberger Jr., the Times publisher, brought the brief press conference to an abrupt end, steering her away.

Sulzberger did not speak, nor did Miller’s attorneys.

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