MONDAY’S LINKS: New Buyer for ‘NY Observer’?, Globe Media’s New Mag, Big Media and the MySpace Set

By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, a 25-year-old real estate scion may be interested in buying the New York Observer, Howard Kurtz notes the range that reporters have had in covering the latest MidEast conflict, and the Boston Globe plans to launch a high-end magazine on home design.


***


Son of NJ Developer Negotiating for Observer
New York Times: The New York Observer is in discussions over its possible sale to Jared Kushner, the 25-year-old son of Charles B. Kushner, the wealthy New Jersey real estate developer , according to Howard Rubenstein, the publicist. “They?re in discussions, but a deal has not been concluded,?? said Mr. Rubenstein, who has represented the father?s company, Kushner Companies, and is representing the son in these negotiations.


***

Globe Media to Launch Luxury Home Magazine
Boston Globe: Boston Globe Media will launch a magazine featuring high-end homes and design this fall as part of a push to diversify the company’s business base and tap into the market for niche publications. The new magazine, Design New England, will debut in October and publish every other month, starting in January. It will have a “controlled circulation” of 50,000, with about 40,000 issues mailed free to affluent households in the Boston area and about 10,000 to architects and designers.


***

A War Between Neighbors, Seen From Their Back Yard
Washington Post: “The 13-day battle between Israel and both Hamas and Hezbollah may be the most up-close-and-personal ever transmitted by television,” writes Howard Kurtz. “Unlike Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2003, where conditions were either too dangerous or tightly controlled by the U.S. military, the Mideast conflict of 2006 allows journalists to roam freely, not just watching rocket attacks but interviewing victims’ families, neighbors, refugees and just about anyone else. It is Vietnam on satellite steroids.”


***

Rupert Murdoch Seemingly Tilts Toward McCain, Away From Clinton
New York Sun: Who will Rupert Murdoch be supporting in 2008? In a candid television interview with Charlie Rose, the chairman of News Corporation last week gave the strongest hints yet. Will it be Senator Clinton? “Unlikely. But not impossible.” Senator McCain? “He would make a fine president.” Mayor Bloomberg? “He would be a very good chief executive of the country.” Whom Mr. Murdoch will pick has come to obsess political commentators — and presidential candidates — because, unlike others who preside over vast press, Internet, and radio and television companies, Mr.Murdoch’s choice will inform the whole of his family-run empire, from Fox News and the New York Post to the London tabloids the Sun and the Times.


***

A Sideline That Competes With a Byline
New York Times: “Content may or may not be king, but it?s mighty valuable,” writes David Carr. “Journalists, who know a thing or two about its creation, are beginning to build sites that help them maintain custody of the content and, if all goes well, reap the rewards. … ‘A lot of journalists are going to have to rethink what they are doing if they are going to survive,’ said Mr. Ali. ‘If you stand back and do nothing, what are you going to do with the rest of your life? The newspaper you are working at could go away and then you won?t have a place to work.'”


***

Can Wikipedia Conquer Knowledge?
New Yorker: Wikipedia is an online community devoted not to last night?s party or to next season?s iPod but to a higher good. It is also no more immune to human nature than any other utopian project. Pettiness, idiocy, and vulgarity are regular features of the site. Nothing about high-minded collaboration guarantees accuracy, and open editing invites abuse. Senators and congressmen have been caught tampering with their entries; the entire House of Representatives has been banned from Wikipedia several times. (It is not subtle to change Senator Robert Byrd?s age from eighty-eight to a hundred and eighty. It is subtler to sanitize one?s voting record in order to distance oneself from an unpopular President, or to delete broken campaign promises.) Curiously, though, mob rule has not led to chaos.


***

Big Media Wooing the MySpace Set
CNN/Money: Many say that if a media company wants to get the attention of teens, advertising on television or other forms of media aren’t nearly as effective as the Web. “There is a sense of urgency about how to attract and market to teens since they are spending so much time online,” said Rusty Williams, vice president with Prospero Technologies, a software firm that helps companies incorporate message boards, blogs, and chats on their Web sites.


***

The J-School Boom
Inside Higher Education: “Declining circulation.” “Weaker ad revenue.” “Fewer jobs.” “Dinosaur.” All of these are from news reports on the present state of the news business. Even The New York Times is cutting her page size to reduce costs. Why then, are some institutions cheerfully touting the creation of new journalism programs? The answer, they say, is that the writing and information gathering skills taught to journalism students are an entr?e to an increasing number of jobs, both journalism and marketing, as the media comes to include both magazines and Webzines, both broadcasts and podcasts.

Like & Share E&P:
RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Visit Us
LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *