MONDAY’S LINKS: ‘Roanoke Times’ Reviews Standards, YouTube’s Political Power, Old Media Wins World Cup

RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Visit Us
LinkedIn

By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, the video-sharing revolution spearheaded by YouTube is grabbing more and more political clout as the election season draws nearer, old media dominates in coverage of the World Cup, and the Roanoke Times reviews its ethical standards and posts the results on its Web site.


***

In Taunting the Times, GOP Follows Dole’s Example
NY Sun: Republican lawmakers who think attacking the New York Times could help carry them to victory in 2006 might want to consider how that tactic played for the party’s presidential nominee a decade ago. In the final stretch of the 1996 campaign, the former Senate majority leader, Bob Dole, unleashed an unexpectedly bitter series of assaults on the newspaper.


***

In YouTube Clips, a Political Edge
Washington Post: “While bloggers played a role in the last presidential election, most advertising and message delivery still comes from campaigns, political parties and interest groups with enough money to bankroll a television blitz,” writes Howard Kurtz. “But the YouTube revolution — which includes dozens of sites such as Google Video, Revver.com and Metacafe.com — could turn that on its head. If any teenager can put up a video for or against a candidate, and persuade other people to watch that video, the center of gravity could shift to masses of people with camcorders and passable computer skills. And if people increasingly distrust the mainstream media, they might be more receptive to messages created by ordinary folks.”


***

Santa Barbara Residents Wonder What’s Next for Their Paper
Los Angeles Times: Mickey Flacks, a 39-year resident and a fixture in activist politics, said the developments would leave the region without a “responsible, independent newspaper.” The fallout to the community — and the News-Press — could be serious, Flacks said. “To not have local news because the staff has disappeared or because the newspaper will simply be Wendy and Travis’ rants is a real loss to the community,” she said. “I hope that something will arrive to take its place, whether it’s a daily newspaper or a website. It’s desperately needed.”


***

Old Media, Not New, Is World Cup Winner
New York Times: At a time when many viewers are turning away from mainstream media, the World Cup demonstrates the continuing power of live sports events to pull in the mass audiences that advertisers crave. Old media’s successes were not limited to television. According to La Tribune, a French business newspaper, the sports daily L’Equipe sold 900,000 copies the day after France’s quarterfinal victory over Brazil, nearly three times its daily average.


***

Use of Internet Video Is Growing at a Faster Clip
Los Angeles Times: A sharp rise in broadband connectivity is spurring the use of video across the Internet. In May, 72% of active Web users in the U.S. connected at home via broadband, a sharp rise from 57% during the same period last year, according to research firm Nielsen/NetRatings. Web services that used to rely solely on text and pictures are starting to take advantage of the faster connections.


***

Strike Shuts Down 25 Egyptian Newspapers
Associated Press: Workers went on strike Sunday at 25 Egyptian newspapers, which did not publish as the legislature in Cairo appeared ready to approve a law that leaves journalists vulnerable to fines and jail time for reports that criticize government officials. About 200 Egyptian journalists gathered in front of the parliament building to draw attention to the clampdown on opposition media, which they described as the government backsliding on reforms promised by President Hosni Mubarak. The president’s ruling party appears to have the votes necessary to enact the bill. A vote is expected Monday..


***

Upholding Core Values Keeps Newspapers Alive
Roanoke Times: Those who rely on us for news and information need to believe not only in the accuracy of what we print, post or record, but in our commitment to community service, to journalistic excellence and to the highest ethical standards. That’s why we recently reviewed and updated our professional standards and practices, which we’ve reposted for the world to see on roanoke.com.


***

Journalists Must Defend Our Right to Do Our Jobs
Chicago Defender: “Let’s just be honest. Everyone loves to hate journalists,” writes Roland Martin. “We are noisy, nosey, unruly and counterculture, often sticking our notepads, tape recorders and cameras in places that anger politicians and corporations. But instead of wanting to beat us up, all of you should give us a standing ovation. In fact, let’s start doing for journalists what we do for the members of the military as they walk through the airport: provide them a loud round of applause and offer to buy their dinner or a round of drinks.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *