MONDAY’S LINKS: Treasury Dept. Planned for SWIFT Leak, YouTube CEO Stars at Confab, Bravo’s NY’DN’ Dish

By: E&P Staff

In today’s links, social networking site MySpace is targeted by hackers, war at the Santa Barbara Press-News, and news that the New York Times SWIFT story leak was expected by the U.S. Treasury.


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SWIFT Leak Was Expected
US News and World Report: Before you jump in with those heaping scorn on the New York Times for using a leak to reveal the secret Treasury program to search financial transactions for terrorist activities, know this: The Treasury Department expected it to leak. When the program was developed in 2003, a press plan was included. The goal: Get out front with the spin that there are safeguards to prevent snooping on private accounts, that it is legal, and that there are big benefits to it.


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Young YouTube CEO Stirs Up Sun Valley
New York Post: Chad Hurley is ready for his close-up.
The laid-back CEO of YouTube, the Web site whose videos are gaining as much buzz as some network shows, was the break-out star of the recently completed media mogulfest in the Idaho hills, several executives who attended the Allen & Co. schmoozefest said. If there was any doubt that Hurley and his partner, Steve Chen, had a monopoly on the media zeitgeist, it was erased during last week’s gathering.


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News Online Seems to Have Long Shelf Life
New York Times: A new research paper seeks to answer a riddle for publishers, editors and even readers: when does new news become old news? In the case of a news article on the Internet, the answer is surprisingly long: 36 hours, according to the paper, ?The Dynamics of Information Access on the Web,? which appeared in the June issue of Physical Review E, the journal of the American Physical Society.


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MySpace Hacked
TMZ: Over the past couple of months, a rash of hacking has taken over MySpace, the most popular Web site since, well, the Web. The scale of the hacks has the MySpace community up in arms and is prompting people to ask when MySpace is going to step up. The hacks are occurring through the bulletin section of each individual’s MySpace profile. The extent of the hack is unknown, but as any MySpace user can tell you, in order to post a bulletin — whether real or counterfeit – you must have access to an individual’s account. That suggests that any and all information that a person has stored within their profile, including personal e-mail addresses, passwords, and e-mails, could be accessible to hackers.


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Bravo Dishes The Dirt on NY Daily News
Washington Post: “With the media’s reputation at record lows, reporters are unlikely protagonists these days,” writes Howard Kurtz. “They are more often in the spotlight for fabrication or plagiarism, for protecting unnamed sources in tangled scandals, or for publishing classified information that the administration says undermines the war on terror. But the bulk of reporting in this country is local reporting on matters closest to people’s lives — violent crime is a staple, especially in New York — and that is Bravo’s focus.”


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At Santa Barbara Paper, Tension Is All Local
New York Times: In her first interview about the resignations, Wendy P. McCaw, the reclusive multimillionaire owner of The Santa Barbara News-Press, said on Sunday that the fault was with those who had left. ?This is not a freedom of the press issue, or of intimidation of the newsroom,? she said. ?There were personality differences in the newsroom, and the people who didn?t want to be there are not there any longer.?


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Do ‘Social’ Search Engines Have the Answers?
Los Angeles Times: Traditional search results are largely based on objective criteria such as counting the number of links other sites have placed to a given Web page. Social search gives people subjective answers — the best sushi restaurant in Chicago or the best website for information about French Impressionism — not necessarily the site visited the most.


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Santa Barbara Staff Goes Public With Complaints
Santa Maria Times: About two dozen Santa Barbara News-Press journalists gathered Friday in De la Guerra Plaza and stood silently with tape over their mouths – the latest salvo in their bitter battle with their employer, newspaper owner and co-publisher Wendy McCaw. The hastily arranged press conference and rally in front of the News-Press’ ornate downtown offices were punctuated by the ninth resignation of a key news staff member in recent days: Presentation Editor Colin Powers announced he was stepping down.

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