‘NY Times’ Leads Overseas Press Club Awards With Three

RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Visit Us
LinkedIn

By: Joe Strupp

The New York Times won three Overseas Press Club Awards to lead all news organizations in the 67th annual competition that honors international journalism, the group revealed Tuesday.

In addition, the awards offered a posthumous honor to Yasser Salihee, a Knight Ridder Iraq correspondent who was killed in 2005. He was one of three Knight Ridder staffers to share the Hal Boyle Award for best newspaper or wire service reporting from abroad. The others were Iraq veterans Hannah Allam and Tom Lasseter.

The awards will be presented by NBC News anchor Brian Williams at the group’s annual dinner in New York on Thursday. Ted Koppel will accept the President’s Award for his “dedicated and continued support of foreign news coverage.” The family of the late ABC News anchor Peter Jennings will light the Press Freedom Candle.

“The elements of courage and creativity are represented by these 21 awards.” OPC President Dick Stolley said in a statement. “These journalists have exemplified the bravery involved in war reporting.”

The Times’ winners include Dexter Filkins, who shares the award for best magazine reporting from abroad with Julian Barnes of U.S. News & World Report. They both covered the plight of American soldiers during the Iraqi counter-insurgency.

Amy Waldman, formerly of The New York Times, won for best business reporting in newspapers for her series on India’s program to pave 40,000 miles of highways. Times’ photographer Rina Castelnuovo took the prize for best photography overseas among newspapers in a series called “Leaving Gaza.”

The Knight Ridder Iraq team won for coverage that was “way ahead of other news organizations in recognizing that the deadly infighting between Shiites and Sunnis could turn into civil war,” the judges said in a statement. Salihee, accidentally killed by U.S. troops, is the first journalist to be honored posthumously by the OPC since 1960.

Iraq-related coverage took several awards, but did not dominate, according to the press club. “The growing importance of Asia drew winning entries from Cambodia, India, Japan, North Korea and Pakistan,” the group said in a press release. “Others came from the Congo, Russia, and the region of Beslan and Siberia.”

The OPC Awards were founded in 1940 to recognize excellence for foreign coverage in the categories of print, broadcast and photography. There were 536 entries in this year’s competition.

Other winners included:


THE BOB CONSIDINE AWARD
Best newspaper or wire service interpretation of international affairs:

Dana Priest, The Washington Post, “The CIA’s Secret War.”

*
THE MADELINE DANE ROSS AWARD
Best international reporting in the print medium showing a concern for the human condition:

Cam Simpson, Chicago Tribune, “Pipeline to Peril.”

*
THE JOE and LAURIE DINE AWARD
Best international reporting in any medium dealing with human rights:

Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times, “Glimpses of a Hermit Nation.”

*
THE ROBERT SPIERS BENJAMIN AWARD
Best reporting in any medium on Latin America:

Bob Davis, Matt Moffett, David Luhnow, Geraldo Samor, John Lyons, John D. McKinnon, The Wall Street Journal, “The Failure of Reform.”

*
THE THOMAS NAST AWARD
Best cartoons on international affairs:

Clay Bennett, The Christian Science Monitor and Mike Luckovich, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

*
THE ROBERT CAPA GOLD MEDAL AWARD
Best published photographic reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage and enterprise:

Chris Hondros, Getty Images, “One Night in Tal Afar.”

*
THE OLIVIER REBBOT AWARD
Best photographic reporting from abroad in magazines and books:

Marcus Bleasdale, American Photo, “The Rape of a Nation.”

*
FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY AWARD
Best feature photography published in any medium on an international theme:

Christopher Morris, VII for Time/Asia, “Inside the Hermit Kingdom”

*
THE LOWELL THOMAS AWARD
Best radio news or interpretation of international affairs.

Rachel Louise Snyder, Sarah Koenig, Ira Glass, WBEZ; Public Radio International, “This American Life: Dreams of Distant Factories.”

*
THE DAVID KAPLAN AWARD
Best TV spot news reporting from abroad:

Richard Roth, Andy Clarke, Nick Turner, James Brolan, CBS News – Evening News, “Pakistan Earthquake.”

*
THE EDWARD R. MURROW AWARD
Best TV interpretation or documentary on international affairs:

Peter Van Sant, Susan Zirinsky, Peter Schweitzer, Joe Halderman, Jonathan Sanders, Michael Mchugh, Michael Vele, CBS News – 48 Hours, “Hostage: The Seige of Beslan.”

*
THE CARL SPIELVOGEL AWARD
Best international reporting in the broadcast media showing a concern for the human condition:

Brent and Craig Renaud, Discovery Times Channel, “Off to War.”

*
THE ARTYOM BOROVIK AWARD
Outstanding reporting by a Russian journalist who displays courage, insight, balanced yet aggressive reporting, and independence of thought:

Marina Dobrovolskaya, Krasnoyarsk TV, “Fight for Justice.”

*
THE WEBSITE AWARD
Best web coverage of international affairs:

Tom Knudson, Hector Amezcua, Seth Vanbooven, The Sacramento Bee.

*
THE MORTON FRANK AWARD
Best business reporting from abroad in magazines:
.
Neil Weinberg, Kiyoe Minami, Forbes Asia, “The Front Line: Japan Sheds Pacifism.”

*
THE CORNELIUS RYAN AWARD
Best nonfiction book on international affair.:

George Packer, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, “The Assassins’ Gate: America In Iraq.”

*
THE WHITMAN BASSOW AWARD
Best reporting in any medium on international environmental issues:

Alan Burdick, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, “Out of Eden: An Odyssey of Ecological Invasion.”



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *