Pittsburgh Paper Fires Longtime Editorial Cartoonist After Dispute Over Trump Work

Rob Rogers says he saw it coming.

A new editorial page chief had come to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette with the support of the newspaper’s owner, a supporter of President Trump. Rogers, the paper’s highly regarded editorial cartoonist for the past quarter-century, suddenly started seeing his cartoons being rejected for print.

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8 thoughts on “Pittsburgh Paper Fires Longtime Editorial Cartoonist After Dispute Over Trump Work

  • June 15, 2018 at 10:01 am
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    The publisher has every right to hire and fire anyone he deems. The cartoonist was more than likely an extremist whose hate for Trump far outdid his usefulness to the paper.

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    • June 15, 2018 at 11:04 am
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      The publisher is not a despot; we already have one of those. He is a temporary custodian of public interest. If the good people of Pittsburgh with a strong history of providing steel to weapons, cars, and the life blood wants to believe Trumps lies about returning jobs then keep drinking the Koolade. If not, then rise up and speak your MIND. Don’t make the mistake that 102 million people made in the last presidential election and not vote your heart and mind. Long Live The 1st Amendment.

      Allan Tamshen, Profiles
      Creator Of Don Lardo

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    • June 15, 2018 at 12:18 pm
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      A wise newspaperman once told this cub reporter, “Listen to your editors, they’ll fire you if you don’t.”

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  • June 15, 2018 at 11:10 am
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    Owners and editorial boards set the agenda and party line every day and all employees understand this. To argue this termination is a violation of ‘freedom of the press’ is not accurate. Employers maintain the right to terminate anyone who chooses not to comply with company doctrine. There is a choice, however, if a person makes the decision to stand on their principles and not comply with a company’s directives, they can expect a one-way-trip out the front door.

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  • June 15, 2018 at 11:16 am
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    Having the personal experience of having been both a publisher and an editor, I have to agree, the publisher does have the right to hire and fire anyone he or she chooses. It may have not been the greatest decision, but it is not a First Amendment issue.

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  • June 15, 2018 at 12:17 pm
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    A wise newspaperman once told this cub reporter, “Listen to your editors, they’ll fire you if you don’t.”
    So quit your whining boys and girls, this is the newspaper business — toughest business in the world!

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  • June 15, 2018 at 5:02 pm
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    Sure, also having been both an editor and a publisher, this is how it works, but the Post-Gaz might no longer feel comfortable praising the ability of “freedom of the press” to deliver all sides of the news. And then along comes the investors who tell the lordly publisher THEY don’t like what he’s doing . . . there’s a question of legalities, yes, but it’s not the same as the question of wide ranging and all-inclusive press freedoms which we assume we enjoy (and assume, say, the Russians don’t). How about calling this action legal, but dirty?

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