THURSDAY’S LINKS: Chasing Leaks a ‘Waste of Time’, ‘NYP’ Nixed ‘Tabloid Wars’, Ads on ‘Trib’ Section Fronts?

By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, Bravo had originally wanted the New York Post to star in its reality series Tabloid Wars, The Chicago Tribune considers running advertisements on section fronts, and two federal prosecutors say that chasing leaks is a “huge, dangerous waste of time.”


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‘Tribune’ Eyes Running Ads on Section Fronts
Crain’s Chicago Business: The Wall Street Journal is allowing ads on the front page. The New York Times now prints ads on the front of its business section. As struggling American newspapers offer up higher-visibility pages to advertisers, will the Chicago Tribune be next? While nothing?s certain, some news-only pages are being eyed for a makeover. A Tribune spokeswoman confirmed Wednesday that the region?s largest daily newspaper is ?exploring opportunities? for advertising on the front pages of more newspaper sections.


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Tabloid Wars: the Series the ‘New York Post’ Turned Down
Eat the Press: Bravo’s reality series Tabloid Wars featuring the New York Daily News airs next Monday, promising a look into “the manic, hurly-burly world of a New York tabloid” — but it’s not the New York tabloid the producers originally had in mind. The show’s producers initially approached the New York Post about being featured in the series, but Post editor-in-chief Col Allan turned them down.


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The Futility of Chasing Leaks
Washington Post: “Almost three years to the day after he published his now-infamous ‘Mission to Niger’ column in which he described Valerie Plame as a CIA ‘operative,’ Robert D. Novak revealed last week what he had told special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald about the sourcing for his article,” write Bruce W. Sanford and Bruce D. Brown. “By supplying corroboration of what has long been suspected — that Fitzgerald knew almost immediately and on his own who Novak’s three sources were — Novak has further confirmed another truth about leak investigations: They are a huge, dangerous waste of time.”


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The Case Against the Media Grab
San Francisco Bay Guardian Editorial: The damage that this newspaper consolidation could do is long lasting and irreparable: Once the papers are all fully integrated under [Dean Singleton’s MediaNews], there will be no way to unscramble the egg. That’s why the court should quickly approve Clint Reilly’s request for a temporary restraining order so the whole thing can be examined in detail, in public, before a judge.


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Tribune Company Hits Up Reporters For Phone Bills
Broward-Palm Beach New Times: “Looks like some Orlando Sun-Sentinel reporters and photographers will soon be hit up with an unexpected phone bill from the Tribune Company — and then fired if they don?t get in line,” writes Bob Norman. “God forbid a working-stiff reporter actually catch a break from a giant newspaper company, whose executives make seven figures while reporters are lucking to make mid-five.”


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Just Say It, Media: ‘America is Bankrupt’
“CJR Daily: “The president says the national debt is under control, and while facts might prove otherwise, we can, to some extent, deal with that,” writes Paul McLeary. “What concerns us nearly as much is that the press corps is generally failing to crunch the numbers, talk to all the experts and then tell us, unequivocally, what the truth is.”


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Life with Brian Tierney
American Journalism Review: When it came to dealing with newspapers, PR man Brian Tierney was known as a bare-knuckled advocate who would bully and intimidate if that?s what it took to get his way. Now he?s the CEO of the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News. Rather than running for cover, journalists are hoping his energy, optimism and connections will breathe new life into the long-suffering former Knight Ridder papers.


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‘Santa Barbara News-Press’ Publisher Battles Ex-Editors
Washington Post: In an e-mail response to questions Wednesday, News-Press owner Wendy McCaw said that she believes strongly in a free press and that the paper is “absolutely not for sale.” Saying that tension between the newsroom and management is healthy, she said she views the problems “as an opportunity to make the News-Press an even better newspaper.”

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