THURSDAY’S LINKS: New SEC Policy for Journo Subpoenas, Call for ‘WaPo’ Apology, Iraqi Brokered Carroll Release

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By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, a new SEC policy for journalist subpoenas, a call for the Washington Post to apologize for pre-war editorials, and an interview with the Iraqi insurgent leader who negotiated Jill Carroll’s release.


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Under New Policy, S.E.C. Will Rarely Subpoena Reporters
he Securities and Exchange Commission unanimously adopted a policy on Wednesday to issue subpoenas to journalists only in rare circumstances and only after exhausting other avenues of investigation. The policy was approved a little more than a month after the commission’s chairman, Christopher Cox, rebuked the agency’s enforcement division for issuing a subpoena to two journalists. The subpoenas were issued in an investigation into accusations that a group of hedge funds and a research firm conspired to manipulate stock prices.


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Why Doesn’t ‘WaPo’ Apologize for Pre-War Editorials?
Though “A Good Leak” may read like the work of a bunch of Bush apologists, it’s not. In its voluminous opining on the administration’s Iraq work in recent years, the Post editorial board has taken plenty of shots at Cheney & Co. All of it would have the ring of authority if the Post would simply say, “We’re sorry for backing an ill-conceived war in the first place.” Other publications?notably the New Republic and the New York Times-have acknowledged their gullibility in swallowing administration propaganda about Iraq’s weapons programs.


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Leader of the Iraqi Insurgency Negotiated Jill Carroll’s Release
The man behind Jill Carroll’s release tells ABC News that kidnapping the American journalist was a mistake. Sheikh Sattam al-Gaood reveals what it took to free her — and why he supports the insurgency.


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The Rise of DIY Journalism
“Citizen journalism advocates would like to democratize the media by encouraging members of the former ‘audience’ to write and disseminate their own news,” writes Cathy Resmer. “That’s increasingly possible, thanks to faster Internet connections and easy-to-use cybertools.”


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‘NYT’ Tells Story of Stern’s Crime Without Skepticism
“The Times’ sources turned over only six — six! — heavily edited minutes of roughly three hours of recordings,” notes Harvey Silverglate. “What’s more, it was Burkle, not Stern, who asked, ‘How much do you want?’ Throughout the snippets reported in the Times, it is Burkle who tries to put into Stern’s mouth the magic words signifying extortion.”


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China’s Newspaper Industry in Crisis
After more than ten years of exponential increase, new media in China has neared a critical point. Internet media will continue to enjoy explosive development in the coming two or three years. In this period, the strong status of the traditional newspaper industry will be fundamentally shaken.

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