THURSDAY’S LINKS: ‘NYT’ Edit Board ‘Sitting Out’ MidEast Crisis?, Google to Disclose Click Fraud, Friendster Patents

By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, Fox News host Bill O’Reilly claims that the editorial board of the New York Times is “sitting out” the Israel/Lebanon conflict in order to avoid alienating its liberal Jewish readers, Google will disclose the number of false clicks on advertisements, and Daniel Gross on why older new-media companies are in decline.


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O’Reilly: NYT Editorial Board ‘Sitting … Out’ MidEast Conflict to Avoid ‘Alienat[ing] Their Liberal Jewish Base’
(MediaMatters: Less than one week after falsely claiming that The New York Times’ editorial writers are “sitting … out” the current conflict between Israel and Hezbollah because the paper fears alienating its purported liberal Jewish base, Bill O’Reilly appeared to modify his theory on his syndicated radio show.


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‘Forward’ Editor: Coverage of Israel/Lebanon Conflict ‘Scrupulously Balanced’
On the Media: “I think at the moment, the American press is attempting to be scrupulously balanced — X number of bombs here, X number of rockets there, a story about a family that suffered losses in Lebanon, a story about a family that suffered losses in Israel,” says J.J. Goldberg. “But when you look at the death tolls, you have to ask why is the balance so scrupulous?”


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Google to Disclose Dishonest Ad Clicks
New York Times: Google Inc., the search engine company, said yesterday that it would disclose to advertisers the number of clicks on ads that it deems are invalid in a bid to assuage concerns over ?click fraud.? A Google business product manager, Shuman Ghosemajumder, said advertisers could now see how many clicks on ads are excluded from their bills.


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Friendster Patent on Linking Web Friends Could Hurt Rivals
Wall Street Journal: Friendster Inc., known for bringing people together, could wind up making enemies among its peers. Last month, the Web company was awarded a patent related to searching for people online based on their relationships, and it expects another patent to come through soon. Now, company executives are weighing their options, including whether to sue rivals. “We want to protect our intellectual property,” says Kent Lindstrom, Friendster’s president. “We’re evaluating what we should do.”


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Why Yahoo!, eBay, Amazon, and AOL are Tanking
Slate: “From the ashes of the 2001-2002 crash there emerged four horsemen of the dot-com apocalypse: Amazon.com, Yahoo!, eBay, and AOL,” writes Daniel Gross. “This quartet of iconic companies, wounded but not destroyed in the crash, survived the plague years and flourished when the market recovered. But in recent weeks, at a time when online advertising and e-commerce are enjoying strong growth, all four have pulled up lame. Each of the horsemen is still a leader in its core business, Google or no Google. But each derives the lion’s share of its revenues from a maturing U.S. market, each is finding profit margins slipping as it tries to diversify, and each has foolishly reached back to tried-and-failed ideas of the dot-com era for salvation.”


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Contempt Case Against SF Videographer Is Latest to Test Press Rights
San Francisco Bay Guardian: If freelance journalist Josh Wolf goes to jail for refusing to turn over what federal prosecutors say is video evidence of a crime that allegedly took place during a demonstration in July 2005, he’ll no doubt become a bigger cause celebre in the lefty blogosphere. But that doesn’t exactly make the prospect of jail time tantalizing. Wolf was hit with civil-contempt charges after refusing to testify before a federal grand jury and turn over video footage he’d obtained at a demonstration last summer in the Mission District against a G8 meeting in Scotland.


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Critic: El Nuevo Herald ‘Ethically Challenged’
Miami New Times: A striking, five-column color photo was splashed across the Sunday, June 25 edition of El Nuevo Herald. It showed four spandex-clad prostitutes in Cuba hailing a foreign tourist. Just a few feet away, two policemen conversed with a little girl and a woman. The headline: “Hookers: The Sad Meat of the American Dollar.” The cops obviously didn’t care about the working girls ? a clear sign of the hypocritically wanton ways of Fidel Castro’s Cuba. Problem is, the picture was a fake.


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Could Philly Papers Move to the ‘Burbs?
Philadelphia Weekly: Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News publisher Joe Natoli sent out one of his monthly memos Tuesday, 24 hours before the start of negotiations with the newspapers? unions on a new contract. The missive runs on for roughly five pages, and includes news that the newspaper company?s iconic white tower offices at 400 N. Broad St. might end up for sale. ?Our building is under-utilized,? says Natoli. ?Options include leasing open space to others, selling the building in a sale/lease-back (which could generate cash to pay down debt, without requiring a move) or selling the building and leasing space in another facility.?

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