THURSDAY’S LINKS: ‘Times-Pic’ City Desk on Katrina, ‘NYT’ Reporter Banned From LA Jail, ‘Click Fraud’ Threatens

By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, a NY Times reporter is barred from an L.A. jail after allegedly misrepresenting herself, media moguls and moneyed elite head out to Camp Allen for their annual summer power confab, and Times-Picayune staff come out with books about the devastation of Hurricane Katrina as seen from their vantage.


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L.A. Jail Bars N.Y. Times Reporter Who Was Let In to Speak With Pellicano
Los Angeles Times: The Metropolitan Detention Center in Los Angeles has barred New York Times reporter Allison Hope Weiner from the facility for allegedly misrepresenting herself in an effort to interview Anthony Pellicano, the celebrity detective at the center of a Hollywood wiretapping scandal.


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Press Disclosures Help More Than Hurt
Christian Science Monitor: “All administrations tend to overclassify information, in terms of volume of documents and the level of classification,” writes Pat Holt. “This proliferation increases the likelihood of leaks. Not many of these that become public can be demonstrated to harm national security. The stories that upset presidents most are those that expose the government doing something it should not be doing, and they are the ones that most need to be published.”


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Bloggers Battle Old-School Media for Political Clout
Boston Globe: Standing somewhere between opinion journalism and straight reporting, the blogosphere occupies an ambiguous space in the media world. Many bloggers, including Moulitsas, are vocal political advocates and, occasionally, current or former campaign consultants — but their online role can also include breaking or reporting the news.
And the political blogosphere’s influence, both online and off, has been growing.


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Moguls Will Be Moguls at Camp Allen
LA Weekly: “Gas up the Gulfstream G550, Jeeves, it?s time for your Master of the Media to attend Camp Allen, that annual summer sleep away in Sun Valley, Idaho, for entertainment, communications, high-tech, Internet and other corporate plutocrats,” writes Nikki Finke. “This year?s confab for monied moguls is from July 10 to 16. I?ve managed to get my hands on the preliminary speakers schedule, and the highlight has to be Barry Diller, Rupert Murdoch and Sir Howard Stringer interviewed by Michael Eisner. Oh, to be a fly on the wall, if only to hear whether FrankenEisner will let someone else gets a word in edgewise.”


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Roughed Up NY ‘Daily News’ Photog to Get Repaid, Pix Nixed
New York Daily News: Daily News photographer John Roca’s pictures of Jessica Simpson are still missing, but the roughed-up lensman did get some good news yesterday. The snazzy Hamptons club whose hulking security guards snatched Roca’s digital memory card from his pocket says it will replace the pants they tore in the holiday weekend dustup.


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Study: ‘Click Fraud’ Could Threaten Pay-Per-Click Model
CNet: Online advertisers estimate that about 14.6 percent of the clicks on ads for which they’re billed are fraudulent, costing them about $800 million last year, according to a study released Wednesday. The study, called “Click Fraud Reaches $1.3 billion, Dictates End of ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ Era” and released by research and advisory firm Outsell, claims that “Google, Yahoo and MSN…are stonewalling on click fraud, to their own and others’ detriment.”


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Condi Gets the (Designer) Kid Gloves Treatment
CJR Daily: “Admittedly, July 4th probably isn’t the best day to turn to the pages of your local newspaper in search of hard-hitting journalism,” writes Paul McLeary. “But still, there’s a certain threshold reporting shouldn’t fall below, even on a lazy national holiday. Yesterday, the Washington Post missed that threshold by about a mile with a puff piece about Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.”


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Hurricane Katrina, Viewed From the City Desk
New York Times: “Path of Destruction” is a coming book by two members of the Times-Picayune’s Pulitzer Prize-winning news team, John McQuaid and Mark Schleifstein, with an emphasis on history, climatology and politics. But Jed Horne, a Times-Picayune metropolitan editor, is after the big picture. His “Breach of Faith” is an amalgam of the feature stories, news analysis, forensic evidence and backroom power plays engineered by New Orleans’s most influential citizens and the hellish ordeals suffered by its least.

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