TUESDAY’S LINKS: Carl Bernstein Calls for Bush Probe, Pulitzer Board Exposes Rift With Bush, ‘Village Voice’ in Turmoil

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By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, Chinese authorities have embarked on a new investigation into the case of a jailed New York Times researcher, the Pulitzer board’s selections highlight a rift between the press and the White House, and the Village Voice is in upheaval as it waits for a new editor.


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Pulitzer Winners Reflect Face-Off With White House
Both the James Risen, Eric Lichtblau story in the New York Times on secret, warrantless surveillance of phone calls and email by the National Security Agency, and the Dana Priest story in the Washington Post on the CIA network of so-called black prisons in foreign countries where captives are held without trial or recourse, have been denounced by President Bush himself as all but traitorous disclosures.


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Carl Bernstein Calls for Bush Probe
On VanityFair.com, former Washington Post scribe Carl Bernstein asks the inevitable “Worse than Watergate?” question concerning possible “high crimes and misdemeanors” carried out by President Bush in regards to Iraq, domestic spying, and a host of other issues. His answer: It’s time for a Wategate-style bipartisan congressional probe of what the president knew and when he knew it.


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Chinese Dash Hopes for Release of ‘NYT’ Researcher
The possibility of resuming the case undercuts speculation that withdrawal of the case last month was intended as a prelude to releasing the researcher, Zhao Yan. The timing also means that a final decision on how to proceed with the politically delicate case will be delayed until weeks after President Hu Jintao has returned from his visit this week to the United States.


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Turmoil Hits Home at ‘Village Voice’
The newspaper has witnessed the departures of its publisher and not one, but two editors in chief, as well as a low-grade reporting scandal and the unexplained termination of a senior investigative reporter. “There are people there who are superior in this work and are just waiting to have their heads lopped off,” said Sydney Schanberg, 72, the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter who left The Voice in February over his objections with the new management. “Not a good atmosphere.”


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First Pulitzer For Fashion Critic
It only took 36 years and The Washington Post to do it, but a fashion critic has finally been awarded the Pulitzer Prize. The Post’s Robin Givhan found out she had received the Pulitzer for criticism over the weekend, but had to wait until Monday afternoon to share the news. “I’m kind of floating,” she said from Washington, D.C., where she was in town for the official announcement in the Post’s newsroom and a cocktail reception later that night on the roof of the Hay-Adams hotel


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China Defends NewRestrictions on Media Freedom
China defended its latest rules controlling foreign access to domestic media and television on Tuesday, saying the government was simply protecting intellectual property rights but was still committed to an open market. Senior officials also said Chinese people preferred reading foreign magazines on science and technology — which are permitted by the government — and that sensitive topics of religion and politics were unsuitable for local readers.


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Stern a Journalist Only as Good as His Brand
“Who’s really to blame for Jared Paul Stern?” asks Simon Dumenco. “I’m going to go out on a limb and pin him on Tom Peters. Peters, of course, is the business guru who came up with the “Brand You” notion in the ’90s, when Stern was still an impressionable 20-something. Pre-Peters, creative people — and white-collar workers — could just do their jobs. Post-Peters, creative people decided they were nothing if they weren’t brands.”


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Winning Winners
“Their very real problems and challenges notwithstanding, newspapers still matter,” writes Rem Rieder. “They perform a vital and often decidedly unglamorous service to our democracy day in and day out, a service nothing else is set up to replicate. Exhibit A: the winners of the 2006 Pulitzer Prizes. Up and down the list are vivid reminders of the wonderful and essential work that newspapers, and the journalists who work for them, do.”


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‘WaPo’ Editorial: Rumsfeld Should Have Left Long Ago
“Bush would have been wise to accept Mr. Rumsfeld’s resignation when he offered it nearly two years ago. At that time it was clear that the defense secretary was directly responsible for the policy of abuse toward detainees that resulted in the shocking Abu Ghraib photographs, as well as far worse offenses against detainees. By then, too, Mr. Rumsfeld’s contributions to growing trouble in Iraq were evident: his self-defeating insistence on minimizing the number of troops; his resistance to recognizing and responding to emerging threats, such as the postwar looting and the Sunni insurgency; his rejection of nation-building, which fatally slowed the creation of a new political order.”

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