TUESDAY’S LINKS: Dissing Kakutani, ‘NYP’ Ethics, Online Ads Thrive

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By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, the New York Post scandal is bringing the paper’s ethics policies into sharp relief, Ben Yagoda doesn’t think the New York Times book critic is any good, and the idea that newspapers’ brands are increasingly less important.


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‘Page Six’ Flap Brings Paper’s Ethics to the Fore
Whatever guidelines the paper may have, they don’t seem to apply to gossip writers. “Most people at the paper were guided by their own moral compass,” said a source. “I think Page Six has its own rules, and people outside Page Six don’t know what they are.”


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PR Man Says Group Won’t Slant Philly’s News
Brian Pace Tierney says that if he and his financial backers win the bidding, they want to give The Inquirer more personality and make it more “fun” to read. “They’re great products,” Tierney said, but “they aren’t marketed as they should be.”


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Critic Slams ‘NYT’ Film Reviewer
Michiko Kakutani recently embarked on her 25th year as a New York Times book critic, and it’s gotten to the point that when her name is mentioned in print, you can see the smoke rising from the page, writes Ben Yagoda. The late Susan Sontag complained, “Her criticisms of my books are stupid and shallow and not to the point.”


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Advertising Increasingly Moving Online
The Internet will account for 6.5% of all advertising by the year after next, up from an earlier forecast of 6% in December, according to global media firm Zenith Optimedia. Online ad spending accounted for 4.5% of the global market last year.


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Newspapers Compromise Brand, Gain Revenue Online
If newspapers are to link to outside sources to give their readers the best possible understanding of a story, readers will begin to identify with the journalist that comments on, aggregates and directs them to that content. Look at Poynter’s Romenesko, an aggregator of all things media, or The Washington Post’s Dan Froomkin who compiles White House Briefing. Now imagine a newspaper website full of journalists that have a similar function for different topics. The reporter becomes the brand.


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Canadian Freelancer Freed From Belarus Prison
Looking relaxed and unfazed by his 15 days in a Belarus prison, freelance journalist Frederick Lavoie arrived home yesterday saying he hopes his time in jail has raised awareness about the restrictions on freedom of expression in that country. “If my detention teaches Quebecers and Canadians about the lack of freedom in Belarus, it would have been worth it,” Lavoie said.

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