TUESDAY’S LINKS: New ‘WSJ’ Fashion and Design Bureau, Do Reporters Make Good Reality TV?, Rupert on MySpace

By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, Rupert Murdoch talks about what is to come as MySpace extends its brand around the world, the Wall Street Journal plans to reconfigure desks to accomodate a new fashion and design bureau, and Troy Patterson asks whether reporters really make a good subject for reality TV.


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New Fashion and Design Bureau at ‘WSJ’
Women’s Wear Daily: Wall Street Journal reporters who cover fashion and style started shuffling desks last week, and it wasn’t just because they all wanted to sit together. The moves were to lay the groundwork for a new fashion and design bureau being formed at the Journal, WWD has learned. The beefed-up coverage won’t become a separate section in the paper, though it will be given its own name and there will be fashion and design articles every day the Journal appears, according to Journal sources.


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Rupert Murdoch on the Rise of MySpace
Hollywood Reporter: Twenty years after Rupert Murdoch upended the status quo in television with the launch of Fox Broadcasting Co., Murdoch and News Corp. are in the vanguard of another media revolution with its recently acquired Internet assets including MySpace.com. The News Corp. chairman and CEO recently spoke with The Hollywood Reporter contributing editor Diane Mermigas about his company’s interactive expansion and what it augurs for traditional media giants.


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Do News Reporters Make for Good TV?
Slate: “Every good reality show requires a pack of self-obsessed showoffs, and that’s what puts Tabloid Wars over the top,” writes Troy Patterson. “You might suppose that the bench-pressers and gym bunnies on Work Out, Bravo’s other new professional reality show, would have an edge here, and feel free to go right ahead supposing. Journalists, with their instinctive story sense, appetite for self-dramatization, and ostrich-egg-sized egos, are naturals for reality TV. You take a narcissist, and then you put him to work, and you know you’ve got something hot on your hands.”


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Iraq, We Hardly Knew You
CJR Daily: “Iraq, forgotten? Is that possible?” asks Paul McLeary. “While calling the war ‘forgotten’ is a little too extreme (we’ll save that title for Afghanistan), recent coverage of the constant, staggering daily death toll has begun to take on the pall of boilerplate copy in the nation’s newspapers. In one sense, it’s understandable: After three years of grinding conflict and daily body counts, eyes may begin to gloss over when reading a story about the latest suicide bombing in Baghdad.”


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New ‘Wash Post’ WH Correspondent Is a Longtime Post Editor and DC Insider
Washingtonian: In choosing Michael Abramowitz for one of its premier jobs, the Post has reached for a Washington insider. He is solid and familiar to the Post?s top brass. Buddies call him ?Bram.? But there?s a bit of risk, too. “I had not written a story in nine years,? he says. ?It?s also my first time covering a big Washington beat.? With Bush generating foreign news, Abramowitz is especially right for the job, as he was raised in a diplomatic family: ?I?ve been living and breathing the stuff since I was three.?


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A Case for Newspapers
CBS News: “With iPods and blogs and the Internet, there is a lot of serious talk about whether newspapers will survive,” writes CBS anchor Bob Schiffer. “Jill Abramson, who is the managing editor of The New York Times, says we use the Internet to search for specific information. But the joy of reading a newspaper comes from finding information we weren’t looking for. Last week reminded me of that. The main news was so grim I found myself turning to the newspapers for relief.”


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PressThink’s Rosen on NewAssignment.net
PressThink: “Enterprise reporting goes pro-am,” writes Jay Rosen. “Assignments are open sourced. They begin online. Reporters working with smart users and blogging editors get the story the pack wouldn?t, couldn?t or didn?t. They raise the money too. There’s $10,000 to test it, courtesy of Craig Newmark. … New Assignment does stories the regular news media doesn?t do, can?t do, wouldn?t do, or already screwed up. And it allows for participation that is effective.”


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Miami as the ‘Candy Store of American Journalism’
PR Week: Michael Sallah received numerous state and national awards for his investigative reports for The Toledo Blade before joining The Miami Herald. In 2004, he shared the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting for a series called “Tiger Force” about a US army platoon during the Vietnam War. Sallah spoke to PRWeek about investigating Miami and his relationship with the PR industry.

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