WEDNESDAY’S LINKS: Times Co. Shareholders’ Ire, ‘Voice’ Housecleaning, Brit Paper’s Apology for Hatcher

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By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, a quarter of investors withhold their votes at the New York Times’ annual shareholders meeting to express dissatisfaction with the company’s performance, Village Voice stalwarts are given the boot by new management, and actress Teri Hatcher gets a public apology from a British tabloid after suing the paper for printing a false story about her.


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28% of Votes Withheld at Times Co. Meeting
Investors holding more than a quarter of the shares of The New York Times Company withheld their votes for directors at the annual meeting yesterday, registering their dissatisfaction with how the company is performing. The only dissenting shareholder identified was Morgan Stanley Investment Management, the company’s fourth-largest shareholder, with 5.8 percent of the stock.


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New ‘Voice’ Management Continues Purge of Lefties
New publisher Michael Lacey made it clear that though his chain had bought The Voice, he didn?t have much taste for the newspaper as it was constituted. If he was the new landlord, he was talking about a gut rehab at a minimum, and possibly a teardown. At a Feb. 1 meeting, Mr. Lacey bluntly told staffers of his plans to eschew Bush-bashing commentary for local investigative pieces.


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‘Sun’ Apologizes to Actress Teri Hatcher
he Sun newspaper and Heat magazine have settled legal cases with Desperate Housewives’ star Teri Hatcher over false claims about her private life. On page four of today’s Sun the paper ran an apology for the story, published in August last year, after reaching a settlement with Hatcher, who was represented by the law firm Schillings.


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Money From a Blog Like Water From a Stone?
While many blogs remain little more than amateur diaries, several bloggers have tried to parlay their online ramblings into branded businesses. One, Jason Calacanis, co-founded Weblogs Inc., a network of blogging sites that was acquired last year by AOL. Mr. Calacanis has been an outspoken proponent of blogs as business vehicles, arguing that quality content can drive enough traffic to attract advertisers. But longtime Internet entrepreneur Alan Meckler is skeptical.


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Islamic Newspaper Launched in Canada
Syed Soharwardy, publisher of the Muslim Free Press, said yesterday the twice-monthly periodical is intended for all Canadians. “Because it’s called the Muslim Free Press, it does not mean it is for Muslims only,” said Soharwardy.


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Appeals Court Upholds Exorbitant Libel Ruling Against Moroccan Paper
“The judges are clearly trying to crush the newspaper by confirming this exorbitant damages award, the biggest ever in a libel suit in Morocco,” Reporters Without Borders said. “A representative of our organisation attended the trial and saw how the rights of the defence were not respected, especially when defence witnesses were cross-examined.”


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Longtime ‘Indy Star’ Columnist to Retire
Ruth Holladay, who has provoked, entertained, challenged, chastised and defended Hoosiers since 1999 with her metro column, will be retiring from The Star on June 30.


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‘LAT’ Editor Joins Merrill College of Journalism Faculty
Deborah Nelson, Pulitzer Prize winner and one of the nation?s leading investigative journalists, will join the Philip Merrill College of Journalism this summer to direct the new Carnegie Seminar program at the University of Maryland, Dean Thomas Kunkel announced. Nelson, the Washington investigative editor for the Los Angeles Times, will join the Merrill College?s prestigious faculty, which includes five other Pulitzer winners.


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Deputy Chief ‘WSJ’ D.C. Bureau Bullish on MSM
David Wessel delivered a talk at the Yale School of Management entitled, “Can Newspaper Journalism Survive Blogs, Fox News, and Karl Rove?? His answer: Pretty much yes, at least in some form. Underlying Wessel’s point was an assumption that the modern “objective” Big Media is a credible, fair, independent news source worth preserving from competition by new “pseudo-news outlets.”


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2 Cases Raise Issues About Reporters’ Protection of Their Sources
“Although Mr. Libby has claimed a right to know what information the press corps in general possessed concerning Mrs. Wilson’s affiliation with the CIA, under that theory he would be entitled to subpoena all reporters in Washington to learn what they knew, and when they knew it,” the filing by Time, a unit of Time Warner Inc., said yesterday. “There is no stopping point to this approach.”

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