WEDNESDAY’S LINKS: Tony Snow as ‘Style Over Substance’, Sulz Buyback?, Knight’s Online Edge

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By: E&P Staff

In today’s edition, reactions to the news that Tony Snow will be the new White House Press Secretary, a call for the U.N. to protect journalists, and a suggestion that the Sulzbergers take the Times Co. private again.


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Tony Snow Is the New Face — and Hair — of the White House
“A big part of the job is appearing on TV,” said Clinton administration press secretary Dee Dee Myers. Although Ms. Myers said she wouldn’t have predicted Mr. Snow for the job, she said the choice would make sense. “Tony has television presence,” she said. “He has a lot of experience with television and radio.”


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Keeping the Core Healthy
“Knight Ridder actually had one of the most innovative and quickly growing online operations of any newspaper company,” writes Clayton Christensen. “The public perception that the company was in trouble, even as its new line of business boomed, highlights how difficult it is to manage the pace of creating new-growth businesses”


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What Knight Was Doing Right
The talks between Gary Pruitt, chairman of McClatchy, and William Dean Singleton, chief of MediaNews have apparently been tense. The men barely exchanged glances as they took their seats for a panel discussion at the annual meeting of the American Society of Newspaper Editors.


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UN Urged to Act on ‘Journalist Slaughter’
The International Press Institute is calling for a UN security resolution on the issue, as part of its campaign to limit the number of reporters killed while doing their job. In the last 10 years, 1,300 journalists and media support staff have died on assignment, according to the IPI. And in the past year alone 110 journalists have died in Iraq – 60% of them Iraqis.


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Loose Lips Win Pulitzers?
“It is hard to see how media apologists can deny their political bias when no fewer than four prizes were given at least in part for Bush-bashing,” writes Max Boot. “There’s nothing wrong with caustic criticism, but two of the award winners went further, into areas that may hamper our battle against Islamist terrorism.”


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Dear Arthur Jr.: Here?s Your Shot — Buy Back Times!
Does The New York Times need a change of ownership? On April 18, Morgan Stanley portfolio manager Hassan Elmasry launched a shareholder protest against The Times’ corporate structure, calling for the abolition of the two-tier stock system that gives the Sulzberger family control of the company. Over the last several months, a different version of Mr. Elmasry?s plan has been floated around West 43rd Street: Instead of getting rid of the Sulzbergers, why not get rid of the shareholders? Could Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr. undo the work of Arthur O. Sulzberger Sr. in 1969 and take The Times private again?


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BBC to Revamp Web Site
The BBC, already the UK?s biggest online brand, on Tuesday signalled its determination to join the fast-growing web world of blogs, open access and online communities. The public broadcaster said it would relaunch its website to feature greater personalisation and more user-generated content as it laid out its strategy to adapt to the so-called ?web 2.0 world?, where users increasingly create their own online communities.


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‘NYT’ Protects Harvard Plagiarist?
“If you want to know the facts about the Harvard plagiarism scandal, don’t go to the Times’ lame and protective coverage,” writes Phillip Weiss. “The Harvard Crimson has thrashed the Times and all others on the Kaavya Viswanathan story.”


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Oldest Belarus Newspaper Fears Closure
The editor of Belarus’ oldest independent newspaper says he may be forced to cease publishing, after authorities told him the weekly is no longer welcome in Minsk, the capital. The editor of Nasha Niva, Andrei Dynko, says Minsk city officials passed that message to him after he was arrested and briefly detained last month.


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‘St Pete Times’ Sets Example
New York Sun Editorial: One of the hallmarks of integrity is, the willingness, when one is wrong, to admit it. An admirable example was set by the St. Petersburg Times, a Florida newspaper that had reacted defensively after it was scooped by the their competitor, the Tampa Tribune, and its reporter Michael Fechter, on the news that a terrorist cell had been operating out of the University of South Florida.

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